TCI Articles

You are here

Top Reasons to Join SPS Today!

1. IEEE Signal Processing Magazine
2. Signal Processing Digital Library*
3. Inside Signal Processing Newsletter
4. SPS Resource Center
5. Career advancement & recognition
6. Discounts on conferences and publications
7. Professional networking
8. Communities for students, young professionals, and women
9. Volunteer opportunities
10. Coming soon! PDH/CEU credits
Click here to learn more.

TCI Articles

TCI Articles

Superpixel provides local pixel coherence and respects object boundary, which is beneficial to stereo matching. Recently, superpixel cues are introduced into deep stereo networks. These methods develop a superpixel-based sampling scheme to downsample input color images and upsample output disparity maps. However, in this way, the image details are inevitably lost in the downsampling and the upsampling process introduces errors in the final disparity as well. Besides, this mechanism further limits the possibility of utilizing larger and multi-scale superpixels, which are important to alleviate the matching ambiguity.

We introduce an efficient synthetic electrode selection strategy for use in Adaptive Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (AECVT). The proposed strategy is based on the Adaptive Relevance Vector Machine (ARVM) method and allows to successively obtain synthetic electrode configurations that yield the most decrease in the image reconstruction uncertainty for the spatial distribution of the permittivity in the region of interest. 

In this paper, we explore the spatiospectral image super-resolution (SSSR) task, i.e., joint spatial and spectral super-resolution, which aims to generate a high spatial resolution hyperspectral image (HR-HSI) from a low spatial resolution multispectral image (LR-MSI). To tackle such a severely ill-posed problem, one straightforward but inefficient way is to sequentially perform a single image super-resolution (SISR) network followed by a spectral super-resolution (SSR) network in a two-stage manner or reverse order.

Conventional digital cameras typically accumulate all the photons within an exposure period to form a snapshot image. It requires the scene to be quite still during the imaging time, otherwise it would result in blurry image for the moving objects. Recently, a retina-inspired spike camera has been proposed and shown great potential for recording high-speed motion scenes. Instead of capturing the visual scene by a single snapshot, the spike camera records the dynamic light intensity variation continuously.

SPS on Twitter

  • Celebrate International Women's Day with SPS! This Tuesday, 8 March, join Dr. Neeli Prasad for "Unlocking the Poten… https://t.co/GDQIgjSpLs
  • Check out the SPS Education Short Courses, new at ! Earn PDH and CEU certificates by attending either in… https://t.co/1uYFNvltg7
  • We're partnering with the IEEE Humanitarian Activities on Wednesday, 2 March to bring you a new webinar, "Increasin… https://t.co/JzhaBl17UY
  • The DEGAS Webinar Series continues this Thursday, 3 March when Dr. Steven Smith present "Causal Inference on Networ… https://t.co/10kppomXdl
  • In the February issue of the Inside Signal Processing Newsletter, we talk to Dr. Oriol Vinyals, who discusses his j… https://t.co/XLQ7tpEq0A

SPS Videos


Signal Processing in Home Assistants

 


Multimedia Forensics


Careers in Signal Processing             

 


Under the Radar